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Monkey re-branded to Monkey X and comes with Desktop target

Monkey by Blitz Research Ltd has been re-branded to Monkey X. Monkey X focuses on multi-platform and multi-device game development. Monkey code translates to the language used by the platform. Javascript for HTML5 games for example and C#/XNA when targeting Xbox 360. Supported platforms are Windows, Mac OSX, Linux, Flash, HTML5, iOS, Android, WP7/8, Xbox 360 and more. Ouya as well!

With the re-branding also comes a new free version. Before, the free version only supported the HTML5 target but now also includes the desktop target. Other targets can be acquired by purchasing a Monkey X Pro license.

Now that the desktop target is freely available as well I think I’ll go give Monkey a try soon. I haven’t used BlitzMax in ages (and I consider it a dead end as well) and since Monkey is very similar to BlitzMax I don’t expect too much trouble to get adapted to it.

Firefox zoom reset at 125%

My new laptop has a 17″ full HD screen and I noticed that in Firefox websites would appear larger than they’re actually are. At first I thought I had accidentally zoomed in a bit but Firefox reported it was at 100%. The cause of this behavior is because Firefox looks at the pixel density of your screen and bases its optimal default zoom level on that.

If you want 100% zoom to be really 100% zoom just browse to about:config and search for layout.css.devPixelsPerPx and change its value to 1.0.

Maximus has been taken down

As of today Maximus, the BlitzMax Module Manager, has been taken down. I’ve blogged about this some time ago and today I’ve decided it was finally time to go through with it. The website now redirects to the GitHub organization that hosts the code for the client and the website. These will still be available online of course.

So what does this mean for Maximus and BlitzMax?

  1. The Maximus client can no longer fetch the sources file from the Maximus website and thus it can no longer download modules from the website as well. You’re back to downloading and installing BlitzMax modules manually yourself. If you’ve got a Maximus webapp instance running somewhere you can however configure the client to use the sources file from there.
  2. Development on both the client and webapp had stopped some time ago, but I would still fix bugs if they popped up. With the cancellation of the hosted webapp this also means I won’t be doing any development on Maximus anymore.
  3. With the source code being available anyone is free to host their own Maximus instance. Since the webapp uses Vagrant and Puppet you should be able to get a local instance running quickly. There’s also an INSTALL file for manual installation on Ubuntu.

Developing Maximus and providing this service has been a fun ride of which I’ve learned a lot and resulted in a well crafted piece of software. I can however no longer provide the service and support it and so it’s time to move on. I want to thank everyone who has supported Maximus in any way possible. Thanks.

Pulling the plug on Maximus, the BlitzMax Module Manager

A couple of weeks ago I talked about the future of Maximus and said that I would inform you about my decision once it was made. I’ve come to a decision about Maximus and have decided that I will pull the plug on it. I just don’t know when yet.

For the time being the website will stay online but I’m no longer making an effort in keeping it up and running. As soon as I need the server resources that Maximus is currently taking I’ll be shutting it down.

There’s a slight chance I’ll move Maximus to my local homeserver which isn’t always available. The only reason I would do this is so I’ll still have a hosted module repository in case I want to use BlitzMax again. But considering I haven’t touched the language in a while I’m not sure yet.

Prevent a MySQL query from using the query cache

Whilst I was busy trying to optimize a MySQL query I got annoyed by the fact that when you make use of MySQL’s query cache that a query gets cached. When that happens a second time you execute the query it’s being looked up and the cached results are being returned. If you want to optimize a query and test its performance this can be quite annoying.

Luckily I found out there’s an easy solution to this problem. Just make use of SQL_NO_CACHE like this:

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Now when you run this query it makes sure MySQL doesn’t store it in its query cache.