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How To Stop Chinese Spam From Flooding Your iPhone? Answer From Semalt

You probably know the significance of using strong passwords and activating the two-factor authentication (2FA) on your Apple devices. Hundreds to thousands of useless Chinese spam messages are sent to and from the iPhone devices. The hijacked iMessage account might fill your iPad, iPhone, Mac or other similar devices with lots of junk and gobbledygook easier than you can imagine. Technically speaking, that’s not a hack but is a sign that someone has guessed your password and is using your device for his stupid activities.

Andrew Dyhan, a top expert from Semalt, has tailored practicals issues that will help you stay safe from such attacks.

A large number of users have fallen prey to such schemes. An England-based security company Sophos published a post on the Naked Security blog, where it shared the experiences of different iPhone users. One of the users said that his iPhone was used illegally to send fake Chinese messages to all of his friends and family members. No report of the data breach has ever been reported, and there is no way to extract a person’s password from his iOS devices. In such circumstances, it may not be possible for anyone to say what’s going on, but Apple Inc. has started John Munn from Belfast summed up the problem, claiming that Android users are complaining about the issue for years. Lots of iPhone passwords are guessed, and accounts are hacked every day. John was not the only victim as Sophos investigated the matter and found that Apple had not received complains about its investigation and has already fixed many issues.

How do the attacks work?

First of all, users get a message saying that their Apple IDs have been accessed from unknown locations or devices. If you receive such notifications on your computer, there is nothing you can do. But if you receive such a message on your mobile phone, you should click on the OK button. Either way, once the initial message is received, the deluge will begin. A large number of devices are spammed on a daily basis. Users also complain about emojis and texts from suspicious sources, and those messages are written entirely in the Chinese language.

The same types of messages are sent to thousands of people from infected accounts. If you translate those messages, they might refer you to a casino or nightclub in Macau. There are chances that the hackers want to steal your information by using the names of famous casinos, but such activities will lead to nonstop barrages of spam. If it says “more information,” that means the attackers have accessed your password or have picked your data up to breach some rules online. Apple claims that it is not possible to access a user’s iMessage account, but the hackers often trick the users and redirect them to unprecedented amounts of garbage. Chances are the user had compromised their passwords in some data breach, such as LinkedIn and Yahoo. They might have used the same password for different accounts, letting the hackers match different email IDs with the same password. In conclusion, you should use strong passwords that might not be guessed by the hackers. You should update your passwords frequently and keep the 2FA activated. If you have some concerns about the security of your account, you should check Apple’s recommendations.

New gear: Roland Cube Lite

Roland Cube Lite

I got some new gear for my guitars! I bought the Roland Cube Lite to have a portable amp to play on when in the living room. Some cool features of it are that you can hook up your iPod Touch and play along with your favorite songs all through the same speaker. And if you use toe iOS app you can even record yourself playing along a song. Another nice feature of the app is that you can mark a section of a song to loop over.

There are three amp models included: JC Clean, Crunch and Extreme. For effects there is the choice of Chorus or Reverb. There’s also a knob for Drive, Volume, Bass and Treble. For your input audio device there’s also a volume knob.

Monkey X Pro – 30% Discount

Monkey X ProA couple of days ago I received an e-mail by Blitz Research Ltd offering me a nice discount on Monkey X Pro, which I took advantage of. To show some love towards BRL and Monkey X Pro I thought I would share the offer here.

Monkey X Pro is a programming language for creating games which can be deployed to several targets including, but not limited to, Android, iOS, HTML5, Desktop, XNA, Ouya and more.

When you buy Monkey X Pro simply enter the coupon code MONKEYX30 for a 30% discount.

Now go buy it and support BRL!

Note: this offer is only available for a limited time and is available until 2nd June.

Convert HTML to PDF with HTML2PDF Web Service

HTML2PDF Web ServiceRecently I launched my new product HTML2PDF Web Service — a web service for converting HTML to PDF.

In this post I’d like to talk about HTML2PDF Web Service. Why to choose it, how to use it and what technologies were used to create it.

Why Choose HTML2PDF Web Service?

Programmatically generating PDF documents is a painful and time consuming problem that neither makes your developers nor designers happy. With HTML2PDF Web Service you can design your invoices or reports in HTML, style them with CSS and convert the resulting page into a PDF document. Using HTML2PDF Web Service saves your developers and designers time which is better spent making your product better.

Say your web application or mobile app (or any application for that matter) needs to generate invoices or reports in PDF format. Unless you can install special HTML to PDF conversion software you’re probably stuck with some of the libraries available for your language that can programmatically generate PDF documents. To do this you would probably design your document in something like MS Word, LibreOffice Writer or perhaps HTML. After this design has been approved you can start programming your PDF module; setting up coordinates, font sizes etc. And then all of the sudden you notice your library has limited support for doing actual document layouts and presenting tabular data that can span multiple lines. Now you need to write your own routines for splitting text over multiple lines, keep track of coordinates and make sure nothing overlaps. If like me you’ve already been there, it’s quite the nightmare.

So being able to design in HTML, style with CSS (heck, even use a bit of JavaScript) and convert the resulting page to PDF would speed up this process a lot. Am I starting to tickle your interest?

How to use HTML2PDF Web Service

Simply create your soon to be PDF documents in HTML, style them with CSS and if wanted you can use JavaScript as well. The final document is best previewed in a WebKit based browser such as Google Chrome, since that’s the technology HTML2PDF Web Service uses in the background to render the HTML and convert it to PDF.

Here are some examples on how to call the web service. Converting HTML to PDF is easy with the HTML2PDF Web Service. You can pass an URL to the page you want to convert or either send the HTML code with the request.

cURL

$ curl -H "X-API-Key: F8802062-4D31-11E3-8F59-BFD4058B6BFF"
       -H "X-API-Username: MyUsername"
       -d '{"content":"<html><head><title>My page</title></head><body><h1>Hello World!</h1><p>I am an HTML page converted to PDF!</p></body></html>"}'
       https://html2pdfwebservice.com/api/convert > page.pdf

Perl

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Mojo::UserAgent;

my $ua = Mojo::UserAgent->new;
my $tx = $ua->post(
    'https://html2pdfwebservice.com/api/convert' => {
        'X-API-Username' => 'MyUsername',
        'X-API-Key'      => 'F8802062-4D31-11E3-8F59-BFD4058B6BFF'
    } => json => {url => 'http://domain.com/invoice.html'}
);
if (my $res = $tx->success) {
    my $pdf_data = $res->body;
}

Ruby

require 'net/https'
require 'uri'

uri           = URI.parse('https://html2pdfwebservice.com/api/convert')
https         = Net::HTTP.new(uri.host, uri.port)
https.use_ssl = true
# In case the SSL certificate isn't accepted
https.verify_mode = OpenSSL::SSL::VERIFY_NONE

req = Net::HTTP::Post.new(uri.path)
req['X-API-Username'] = 'MyUsername'
req['X-API-Key']      = 'F8802062-4D31-11E3-8F59-BFD4058B6BFF'
req.body              = '{"url": "http://domain.com/invoice.html"}'

res = https.request(req)
if res.code == '200'
    pdf_data = res.body
    # - or write to file -
    # File.open('invoice.pdf', 'w') { |file| file.write(res.body) }
end

PHP

$settings = array(
    'url' => 'http://domain.com/invoice.html',
);

$curl = curl_init();
curl_setopt($curl, CURLOPT_POST, 1);
curl_setopt($curl, CURLOPT_POSTFIELDS, json_encode($settings));
curl_setopt($curl, CURLOPT_HTTPHEADER, array(
    'X-API-Username: MyUsername',
    'X-API-Key: F8802062-4D31-11E3-8F59-BFD4058B6BFF'
));

curl_setopt($curl, CURLOPT_URL, 'https://html2pdfwebservice.com/api/convert');
curl_setopt($curl, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, 1);
// Helps to debug in case of issues
// curl_setopt($curl, CURLOPT_VERBOSE, 1);

// In case the SSL certificate isn't accepted because of outdated certificates
// on your server
curl_setopt($curl, CURLOPT_SSL_VERIFYPEER, false);

$res = curl_exec($curl);
// Save PDF to disk
file_put_contents('document.pdf', $res);
curl_close($curl);

Technologies used to develop HTML2PDF Web Service

The most interesting part in developing HTML2PDF Web Service was choosing which technology to use for converting HTML to PDF. After doing research on the subject and testing several solutions I eventually went with a WebKit based solution. By using WebKit it’s easier for the end user to preview their document using a WebKit based browser.

The HTML to PDF conversion server was developed using Go. Go is a fun language to program with, does concurrency in a really nice way and can produce a native executable for Linux, OS X, Windows and some other platforms. Thanks to Go the conversion server is fast, snappy and low on memory and CPU usage. Being able to create a binary executable allows me to sell the conversion server as a standalone product as well.

To get access to the web service there’s also a web application which is written in Perl. My favorite web framework of choice has become Mojolicious for quite some time now and thus HTML2PDF Web Service has been written with it. DBIx::Class has been used for database interaction and Validation::Class is used to validate all user inputted data.

Used databases are PostgreSQL and Redis. The former is used to store user accounts, subscriptions and more. The latter is used to keep track of token usage per user.

Sign up now for a free trial

If after reading all this and you’re still reading, please do sign up for a free trial. The trial gives full access to all the features of the web service so if you like it, please consider buying a subscription.

In case of any questions, please do contact me either through the comments on this page or send an e-mail to support at support@html2pdfwebservice.com.

Monkey re-branded to Monkey X and comes with Desktop target

Monkey by Blitz Research Ltd has been re-branded to Monkey X. Monkey X focuses on multi-platform and multi-device game development. Monkey code translates to the language used by the platform. Javascript for HTML5 games for example and C#/XNA when targeting Xbox 360. Supported platforms are Windows, Mac OSX, Linux, Flash, HTML5, iOS, Android, WP7/8, Xbox 360 and more. Ouya as well!

With the re-branding also comes a new free version. Before, the free version only supported the HTML5 target but now also includes the desktop target. Other targets can be acquired by purchasing a Monkey X Pro license.

Now that the desktop target is freely available as well I think I’ll go give Monkey a try soon. I haven’t used BlitzMax in ages (and I consider it a dead end as well) and since Monkey is very similar to BlitzMax I don’t expect too much trouble to get adapted to it.