Home » Archive by category "Windows" (Page 3)

File Joiner for .001 files

Earlier this week I was in need of a file joiner for .001-files (and .002, .003 etc.). I always though I could do this with WinRAR but that didn’t do the trick. I know Quickpar can do it as well but it requires the .svf-file. I’ve also done it using the command line (I think it was with cat) but only using Linux, not sure how to do it using the Windows command line. Thankfully there’s also File Joiner! A simple application where you select the files or a folder containing the .001-files and then simply let the application join the files.

cmder – Portable console emulator for Windows

Looks like there’s finally a decent replacement for the Windows command line tool! It’s called cmder and comes with Git (optionally) and a bunch of other great command line utilities such as curl, cat, ls, less and even ssh!

I did run into a couple of issues with the console not responding and also couldn’t use tmux during an ssh session. But that’s fine for now, I’m willing to give it a chance. You can get it at http://bliker.github.io/cmder/.

cmder

Quick impression of Rocksmith 2014

A little bit over a year ago I purchased the first Rocksmith on PC to get back into regular guitar playing. In the end I’ve only spent about 13 hours playing it. Not nearly enough to really get through some songs though I did master a couple of them. The reasons I didn’t invest more time in it were due to sound lag issues, the confusing interface (the fretboard is displayed with a slightly angled view), practicing a song was difficult, bad detection (power chords always failed for some reason) and having to play the songs that the game decided was a pain as well.

So I was a little weary of buying the latest Rocksmith 2014 game. For good reasons if I say so myself. But the stuff they showed at E3 such as the session mode and riff repeater made me decide to get it anyway. One very nice thing is that all the DLC you bought for the first Rocksmith can be used in the 2014 edition.

I’m liking Rocksmith 2014 a lot more than the first game. The riff repeater is a great tool that helps you master a riff. You can adapt difficulty and speed so you can gradually master a riff. I’ve done this before with Guitar Pro using the loop-feature and tweaking the speed. But with the variable difficulty setting Rocksmith 2014 makes you learn core notes of a riff first and every time you have a perfect run it increases the difficulty which adds more notes. With difficult parts what helps for me is to turn down the speed to around 80-85% with difficulty at 100%. Then after a couple of runs I crank it all up to 100% and try that.

When playing a new song it starts at an easy level and it gradually increases the difficulty if you’re doing well. This feature was available in the first Rocksmith as well but as far as I can tell all I could do is change the difficulty back to very easy to the highest level. Not really great when trying to learn the song.

I’m only 4 hours in and have almost mastered Bring Me To Life by Evanescence (I’m at 99.7% or something). And with Wheels by Foo Fighters I’ve already been able to master a part of the solo and some other parts. With the first Rocksmith I couldn’t really get anywhere with it.

In the few hours I’ve played I’m liking Rocksmith 2014 a lot more than the first game and will try to play more frequent (daily?) now. I try to play the guitar at least 3 times a week, but never learn anything new. With Rocksmith 2014 I’m finally learning new stuff again. Such as pinch harmonics, which so far have proven to be challenging :-).

Monkey re-branded to Monkey X and comes with Desktop target

Monkey by Blitz Research Ltd has been re-branded to Monkey X. Monkey X focuses on multi-platform and multi-device game development. Monkey code translates to the language used by the platform. Javascript for HTML5 games for example and C#/XNA when targeting Xbox 360. Supported platforms are Windows, Mac OSX, Linux, Flash, HTML5, iOS, Android, WP7/8, Xbox 360 and more. Ouya as well!

With the re-branding also comes a new free version. Before, the free version only supported the HTML5 target but now also includes the desktop target. Other targets can be acquired by purchasing a Monkey X Pro license.

Now that the desktop target is freely available as well I think I’ll go give Monkey a try soon. I haven’t used BlitzMax in ages (and I consider it a dead end as well) and since Monkey is very similar to BlitzMax I don’t expect too much trouble to get adapted to it.

Reset Windows 8.1 screensize

I was happily running Windows 8 on my 17″ laptop with full HD screen and had no complaints when it came to the size of icons and texts. After I upgraded to Windows 8.1 I noticed that the icons on my desktop and taskbar were a lot smaller than before. After opening my text editor of choice (GVim) I noticed that the text was smaller as well.

Whilst I kinda liked the size of the icons I didn’t care much for the new font size so I started looking for a solution. Thankfully there is one.

Through system settings locate your display and check the checkbox numbered 1 in the picture. This picture is in Dutch but I suspect the location of these settings are the same in other languages. Next at number 2 select ‘normal 125%’ and save your changes.

Windows 8.1 screensize fixAfter these changes all should be normal again. It’s probably not required for bigger screens with a 1080p resolution such as a 24″ display. But on a 17″ laptop with a 1080p resolution it just gets a bit too small.

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