Home » iOS » How To Stop Chinese Spam From Flooding Your iPhone? Answer From Semalt

How To Stop Chinese Spam From Flooding Your iPhone? Answer From Semalt

You probably know the significance of using strong passwords and activating the two-factor authentication (2FA) on your Apple devices. Hundreds to thousands of useless Chinese spam messages are sent to and from the iPhone devices. The hijacked iMessage account might fill your iPad, iPhone, Mac or other similar devices with lots of junk and gobbledygook easier than you can imagine. Technically speaking, that’s not a hack but is a sign that someone has guessed your password and is using your device for his stupid activities.

Andrew Dyhan, a top expert fromĀ Semalt, has tailored practicals issues that will help you stay safe from such attacks.

A large number of users have fallen prey to such schemes. An England-based security company Sophos published a post on the Naked Security blog, where it shared the experiences of different iPhone users. One of the users said that his iPhone was used illegally to send fake Chinese messages to all of his friends and family members. No report of the data breach has ever been reported, and there is no way to extract a person’s password from his iOS devices. In such circumstances, it may not be possible for anyone to say what’s going on, but Apple Inc. has started John Munn from Belfast summed up the problem, claiming that Android users are complaining about the issue for years. Lots of iPhone passwords are guessed, and accounts are hacked every day. John was not the only victim as Sophos investigated the matter and found that Apple had not received complains about its investigation and has already fixed many issues.

How do the attacks work?

First of all, users get a message saying that their Apple IDs have been accessed from unknown locations or devices. If you receive such notifications on your computer, there is nothing you can do. But if you receive such a message on your mobile phone, you should click on the OK button. Either way, once the initial message is received, the deluge will begin. A large number of devices are spammed on a daily basis. Users also complain about emojis and texts from suspicious sources, and those messages are written entirely in the Chinese language.

The same types of messages are sent to thousands of people from infected accounts. If you translate those messages, they might refer you to a casino or nightclub in Macau. There are chances that the hackers want to steal your information by using the names of famous casinos, but such activities will lead to nonstop barrages of spam. If it says “more information,” that means the attackers have accessed your password or have picked your data up to breach some rules online. Apple claims that it is not possible to access a user’s iMessage account, but the hackers often trick the users and redirect them to unprecedented amounts of garbage. Chances are the user had compromised their passwords in some data breach, such as LinkedIn and Yahoo. They might have used the same password for different accounts, letting the hackers match different email IDs with the same password. In conclusion, you should use strong passwords that might not be guessed by the hackers. You should update your passwords frequently and keep the 2FA activated. If you have some concerns about the security of your account, you should check Apple’s recommendations.

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